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Four days ago i met my girlfriend and i now i miss her and i am sad


Okay Beatles fandom, lets make John Lennon snorting a coke bottle the most reblogged pic on Tumblr

theres-nothing-to-get-hung-about:

macca-was-the-walrus:

fred-brian-roger-john:

freddiesexybeastmercury:

rogeronthewaters:

fred-brian-roger-john:

deakydoo:

freddiesprincess:

themindsproutsimagination:

rustincountdowntoyouthanasia:

rogertaylorr:

image

omfg

THE NOTES

The times I’ve reblogged this…

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image

My baby will go far in the world of tumblr

(Source: inthemidstofmonsters, via wibblywobblyfamilybusiness)


Teen Wolf
↳ Memorable Quotes

(Source: katnisstrinket, via capableofbeingkickass)


theatrelover1297:

thingswelovefrom-thebookofmormon:

Musical theatre people be like

Yeah its true

(via vive-la-enjolrass)


livieles:

Erika Linder

livieles:

Erika Linder

(via erikalinderfanpage)


bleep0bleep:

elisera:

today is the day where I typed teen owl while tagging.

image

(via persephones-flowers)


aceofgeeks:

I have no words that could possibly make this any better.

(via combilicious)


Why are we talking to each other in English?

— Two non English speakers who share the same first language while chatting on the net, probably (via ignitiondorks)

(via tybaltlicious)


thrillingtragedy:

tensualsexion:

raysoflightinthedark:

mapsontheweb:

Dialects of the Italian language

We may cry foul about the rules of English, but thank God the only thing we have to worry about is diction and accents, and not dialects.

And please consider that each of these dialectal region corresponds to different traditions, different mentality, different culture. Not to mention that, syntactically, Italian is one of the most difficult Neo-Latin languages because of the immense number of irregular verbs.
Gosh I love my country.

And dialects have different phonetic systems, different vocabulary, slang words derived from foreign languages and so on. Sometimes I find it difficult to recognize a dialect even though I can perfectly understand the dialect of its neighbouring cities. Even Rome itself has variations based on the suburb. Calabria, for example, has some dialects that are very similar to Sicilian, like Rosarnese (28), even though it’s not as close to Sicily as other parts of the region. And some colloquial terms (of dialects in Southern Italy) are derived from not only Greek, but also Arab. Among others. A lot of dialects are pretty much considered as languages of their own, not unlike Sardinian (which is officially a language of its own). It’s really complicated because, if the school system doesn’t do its job, this huge variety creates a reverse illiteracy towards Standard Italian.
Another thing I think could be noted is that there’s also a lot of mingling between dialects because of migrations from Southern Italy to the North. I met a relative from Calabria, recently, who went to live in Verona and she not only speaks and understands both dialects, but also uses words from Veronese when speaking in Calabrese. So it’s not only a sign of an incredibly rich cultural diversity (some meals have different names based on the region/city, for example), but also a chance for seeking mutual understanding. Or, if you’re a xenophobic asshole, a chance for discrimination.
The fact that there are a lot of dialects helps a lot with integration for sons of migrants, from what I’ve seen. They’re easier to pick up (dialects, I mean) because they’re more used with friends, in informal settings, and they help create bonds. Sadly enough, a person of foreign descent is less likely to be discriminated if they have an accent or speak a dialect. And before tumblr jumps at me for cultural erasure, don’t worry, everyone still keeps their own cultural elements. 
So, yeah, next time you wonder what’s the level of language proficiency in Italy, look at this map. An Italian will (have to) learn Standard Italian, its area’s dialect(s), English, a second foreign language starting from middle school (French or Spanish, but some schools also started offering Chinese as an option, in the last few years) and, if they choose to, Latin and Ancient Greek in high school. Some also develop great accents, some don’t. But now you know what they have to deal with ;)

thrillingtragedy:

tensualsexion:

raysoflightinthedark:

mapsontheweb:

Dialects of the Italian language

We may cry foul about the rules of English, but thank God the only thing we have to worry about is diction and accents, and not dialects.

And please consider that each of these dialectal region corresponds to different traditions, different mentality, different culture. Not to mention that, syntactically, Italian is one of the most difficult Neo-Latin languages because of the immense number of irregular verbs.

Gosh I love my country.

And dialects have different phonetic systems, different vocabulary, slang words derived from foreign languages and so on. Sometimes I find it difficult to recognize a dialect even though I can perfectly understand the dialect of its neighbouring cities. Even Rome itself has variations based on the suburb. Calabria, for example, has some dialects that are very similar to Sicilian, like Rosarnese (28), even though it’s not as close to Sicily as other parts of the region. And some colloquial terms (of dialects in Southern Italy) are derived from not only Greek, but also Arab. Among others. A lot of dialects are pretty much considered as languages of their own, not unlike Sardinian (which is officially a language of its own). It’s really complicated because, if the school system doesn’t do its job, this huge variety creates a reverse illiteracy towards Standard Italian.

Another thing I think could be noted is that there’s also a lot of mingling between dialects because of migrations from Southern Italy to the North. I met a relative from Calabria, recently, who went to live in Verona and she not only speaks and understands both dialects, but also uses words from Veronese when speaking in Calabrese. So it’s not only a sign of an incredibly rich cultural diversity (some meals have different names based on the region/city, for example), but also a chance for seeking mutual understanding. Or, if you’re a xenophobic asshole, a chance for discrimination.

The fact that there are a lot of dialects helps a lot with integration for sons of migrants, from what I’ve seen. They’re easier to pick up (dialects, I mean) because they’re more used with friends, in informal settings, and they help create bonds. Sadly enough, a person of foreign descent is less likely to be discriminated if they have an accent or speak a dialect. And before tumblr jumps at me for cultural erasure, don’t worry, everyone still keeps their own cultural elements. 

So, yeah, next time you wonder what’s the level of language proficiency in Italy, look at this map. An Italian will (have to) learn Standard Italian, its area’s dialect(s), English, a second foreign language starting from middle school (French or Spanish, but some schools also started offering Chinese as an option, in the last few years) and, if they choose to, Latin and Ancient Greek in high school. Some also develop great accents, some don’t. But now you know what they have to deal with ;)

(Source: languagemaps.wordpress.com, via seagreeneyes)